Itanium makes market debut

Visitors interested in Intel’s 64-bit architecture should drop by the chipmaker’s stand in hall three, where demos are running on systems from HP, Dell and Fujitsu Siemens.

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By  Greg Wilson Published  October 13, 2001

The competition is intensifying in the high-end server market at this year’s show with the region’s initial glimpse of Itanium processing power.

Visitors interested in Intel’s 64-bit architecture should drop by the chipmaker’s stand in hall three, where demos are running on systems from HP, Dell and Fujitsu Siemens.

“This is going to be the first time it’s been publicly shown in the Middle East,” says Ferhad Patel, e-business manager, Intel Middle East.

One of the machines on display is powering the recently released Limited Edition 64-bit version of Windows 2000 Advanced Server, running a supply chain management application from German-vendor OpenShop. Another system from HP is displaying HP-UX for IA-64, “and [HP has its] own demonstration running,” says Patel.

But exactly how soon the region is going to take to Intel’s next generation architecture remains to be seen. Patel admits that industry acceptance is likely to take some time, as businesses are going to wait for both IA-64 developed applications from the big name ISVs and reference sites.

“We’re working closely with the industry, including the ISVs,” says Patel.
Although widespread adoption isn’t expected until the next generation McKinley machines, Intel has already began a seeding campaign within the region, to encourage early testing, build awareness and adoption.

“There are going to be four systems in place with customers before the end of the year,” predicts Patel.

Intel isn’t likely to have the high-end computing sector all its own way. In hall four Sun Microsystems is touting its proprietary 64-bit SPARC/ Solaris computing infrastructure.

With the number of viable Unix platforms thinning out almost on a yearly basis, Sun is still confident of its own longevity.

“We’ve been 64-bit for three or four years... [Intel] is playing catch up,” says Hein Van Der Merwe, solution architecture for high-end data centres, Sun Microsystems.

“We’re offering a strong investment protection and we’re working with ISVs,” he adds.
GO TO STAND: K3-2

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