One chip becomes two with new Intel technology

Intel is working on introducing technology next year that will enable software programmes to see a microprocessor as two chips instead of one.

  • E-Mail
By  Robin Duff Published  September 19, 2001

Intel is working on introducing technology next year that will enable software programmes to see a microprocessor as two chips instead of one. This could lead to a performance increase of up to 30% on certain Intel chips.

Hyper-threading, as Intel calls the technology will be available next year on the company’s 64-bit McKinley processor, which will be aimed at workstations and servers. After that, Intel intends to build the technology into Pentium 4.

The move signifies a shift away from the company’s obsession with speed, which, now that 2GHz has been reached, is less important to the company in the short term.

“We need to change the pattern of our investments…and think beyond megahertz,” said Paul Ottelini, Intel’s executive vice president.

Processors equipped with Hyper-Threading will be able to manage incoming data from different applications and continuously switch from one set of instructions to another without losing track.

A number of key software developers, including Microsoft, have already pledged support for Hyper-Threading, and analysts are saying that it, if it works as well as Intel say it will, could give Intel a boost over competitors such as Sun Microsystems.

Beyond chip developments, Intel has confirmed that it intends to enter the tablet computing market with a new device about the size of an average hardback book, and will be powered by the company’s upcoming Tualatin chip.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code