Microsoft moves into the handset business

Microsoft has announced that it has invested in a UK-based handset maker Sendo, in move to drive the use of its “Stinger” smart-phone operating system.

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By  Robin Duff Published  July 24, 2001

Microsoft has announced that it has invested in a UK-based handset maker Sendo, in move to drive the use of its “Stinger” smart-phone operating system. The software giant is hoping that, through becoming more involved in the development of handsets themselves, it will gain a little more control over the introduction of Stinger-based phones.

"It'll give us the ability to work even closer on development and hopefully bring the product to market very quickly," said Phil Holden, Microsoft's mobility group director.

Stinger is Microsoft's code name for its software that will run on a family of smart phones— a class of wireless phones with oversized displays and color screens— designed for wireless Web access and conventional phone calls.

Stinger, like other Microsoft technology currently under development, also ties into the company's .Net technology for delivering software and data as a service to PCs, cell phones, PDAs and other computing devices. Stinger represents part of Microsoft's strategy for delivering information to cell phones and other wireless devices through Internet servers using Microsoft products and services.

The product has been in the works for two to three years and will be marketed by Samsung in the United States and Europe. None of the major mobile phone manufacturers, such as Nokia and Motorola, have been approached.

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