AMEInfo broadens business opportunities

AMEInfo.com is continuing to diversify its business interests in response to tough conditions in the Middle East online advertising market, says MD, Klaus Lovegreen.

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By  Rob Corder Published  May 8, 2001

AMEInfo.com is continuing to diversify its business interests in response to tough conditions in the Middle East online advertising market.

The online business information specialist, which is already generating revenues from reselling content to international publishers, has now forged strategic alliances with software solution vendors that can add value to the AMEInfo.com site, as well as partner sites.

One of those alliances, with Ep-One Middle East, will allow AMEInfo.com to add ‘situations vacant’ details to any company’s Yellow Pages-style directory listing on the Web site. The Ep-One solution also allows companies to embed the job listing data into their own corporate sites. AMEInfo.com is offering the service for a flat fee of $500 per year.

Ep-One Middle East is also partnering with AMEInfo.com to offer new streaming media services from Impatica. The Impatica solution converts PowerPoint presentations into streaming media that can be accessed via the Web. The technique is seen by advertising agencies around the world as an interesting new way of delivering more sophisticated online messages.

AMEInfo.com will offer the Impatica solution as a service. Companies wanting to convert their PowerPoint presentations will pay AMEInfo.com $10 for each conversion and upload.

AMEInfo.com is keen to stress that its diversification strategy, which could soon include annual subscription fees for Middle East financial data, is not being forced by mounting losses. The company’s mandate has always been to operate at a profit, according to Klaus Lovgreen, AMEInfo.com’s managing director, who recently released a financial report showing the company doubling its year-over-year quarterly profits. “The online advertising market is not that bright at the moment, and wireless [content services] doesn’t look like it will be as big as we thought, so we have to continue looking for other sources of revenue,” explained Lovegreen.

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