Compaq Middle East appoints new MD

A four-month selection process to find a new managing director for Compaq Computer Middle East ended today with the promotion of Joseph Hanania to the post.

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By  Rob Corder Published  March 13, 2001

A four-month selection process to find a new managing director for Compaq Computer Middle East ended today with the promotion of Joseph Hanania to the post.

The Compaq veteran, who first worked at the company’s headquarters in Houston before moving to the Middle East in 1995, was promoted from his previous position as general manager for Gulf and Levant. “I am delighted to have been given the opportunity to play such an integral part within the organisation,” said Hanania.

Hanania’s goal is to bring Compaq’s full service strategy to the Middle East. Under Michael Capellas, who became the company’s CEO 2 years ago, Compaq has set about to reduce its dependence on PC sales and evolve itself into a company capable of taking on IBM in the world’s largest accounts.

Compaq’s focus for the future constitutes maintaining leading position in the PC and consumer products sector and a drive towards further growth in solutions integration and services in the region, explained Hanania.

“Compaq has made great strides in 2000 by demonstrating its ability as a services and solutions company, with customer partnerships such as Etisalat, Fastlink, MobiNil, Click GSM, Egypt Air and Saudi Telecom. This has been a direct result of Compaq’s sound strategic direction, with a strong well-established team in place to deliver to its customers,” he added.

During Hanania’s presentation, he shared the latest results of IDC’s local market research. The overall market for IT hardware, software and services is expected to grow to $4.6 billion for the Middle East by 2002, according to the latest IDC report.

The research company’s latest report, which pegged last year’s Middle East IT spending at $3.2 billion, expects spending to rise to $3.8 billion this year.

Additional hardware sales account for the majority of the sales growth expected between 2000 and 2002, but software and services are beginning to make a greater impact on the figures.

IDC expects the market for IT services alone to be worth over $1.1 billion this year and software to account for $500 million.

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