Sun takes on Microsoft: launches Web strategy

Sun has delivered its answer to archrival Microsoft’s .Net strategy for building, deploying and accessing application services across the Web.

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By  Robin Duff Published  February 8, 2001

Sun has delivered its answer to its archrival Microsoft’s .Net strategy for building, deploying and accessing application services across the Web. The Sun Open Net Environment, or Sun ONE, comprises the Java 2 enterprise platform, Sun’s Forte development tools and iPlanet software.

“The goal here is not to get you on the Internet, but to get you off the Internet and everything else [such as devices] on the Internet,” said Scott McNealy, CEO of Sun.

Analysts believe that the competition between Microsoft and Sun has moved from the Java platform and its threat to the Windows operating system to whether the enterprise will choose to build a Web services architecture on Windows or Unix, the former using Microsoft tools and the latter Java-based tools.

“We now have a war…and the danger for the Unix folks is that this is a war Microsoft know how to fight,” an industry analyst said. “Unless the Java alliance rallies round J2EE and Web services, the y can lose the mid market that they were gaining in.”

Microsoft owns the low end, small to medium enterprise market, but J2EE rules the high-end roost.”

McNealy said the company’s vision of Web services, which he has called “smart services,” was wrapped around the company’s software and tools. Full delivery of the platform for Web services is likely to occur in the second half of 2002.

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