Excellence in Ethics organisation educates Gulf

Gulf Centre for Excellence in Ethics is holding a two day conference in Dubai to highlight the need for regional business leaders to assess their ethical codes of conduct.

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By  Rob Corder Published  October 10, 2000

Bending the rules, making a quick buck, paying suppliers well after you collect money from creditors are all part of staying ahead in business, right?

Wrong, according to the Gulf Centre for Excellence in Ethics (GCEE). In fact, the opposite is true, says the organisation’s managing director, Alex Zalemi. “It is our strong belief that only by addressing key ethical issues will the region’s entrepreneurs be able to collectively maintain global business partner and customer confidence in enterprises originating from this region,” he explains.

GCEE is going public with these views at a two-day conference next month. The Gulf International Conference on Cyber Ethics will be held at the Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry (DCCI) on the 19th and 20th November.

The Conference will focus on ethics and integrity issues in the sector of e-financial services, on intellectual property rights as they apply to e-commerce and on the inherent challenges of regulating the Internet. It will feature prominent speakers from regional and international organisations including the OECD, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Business Software Alliance (BSA).

“The timing of this event is critical, coming as Dubai brings truly regional focus to the growth potential of Internet-based enterprises,” said Zalami.

The GCEE is affiliated with the Washington-based Ethics Resource Center. The Centre’s role has been the pursuit of organisational ethics standards on a global scale, advising multinational corporations, governments and local organisations and facilitating the creation of centres of excellence to address issues of ethics and integrity in environments with diverse cultural and social structures.

“Our goal is to assist organisations in formulating ethical standards that are consistent with local values and cultures and, at the same time, with emerging global norms of best practice, said Zalami.

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